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The gender pay gap grossly underestimates women's economic inequality

Joan Williams (2010)

Williams takes a hard look at the data and assumptions behind the standard measure of women's economic inequality. According to this measure, women currently earn 77 cents for every dollar men earn. However, this measure "grossly overestimates women's economic equality. Why? Because it compares men who work full time with women who work full time. "Many more women than men work part-time and part-time work in the U.S. is shockingly underpaid. According to William, when all employed women are compared with all employed men, including part-timers as well as full-timers, women only earned 59 cents for every dollar earned by men!

Read more HERE.

77 cents on the dollar isn’t fair

New York Times Editorial (2011)

Read more HERE.

There is no male-female wage gap:

Carrie Lukas (2011)

Read more HERE.

When does gender matter?

Gender differences in specialty choice among physicians

Manwai Ku (2011)

In this large-scale study, Ku’s aims are to: assess how the extent of gender segregation among doctors may vary over career time; and to ascertain the correlates of specialty plans and pursuits at entry into medical school and at a later stage in medical education and training.

Findings support the view that women and men prefer and hence choose different specialties has merit. Yet, this view may not be the entire picture. For example, the women tended to find their partners’ careers limiting their own careers, and they may be more likely than men to postpone marriage and family.

'Mancession' focus masks women's real losses.

Caryl Rivers & Rosalind Barnett (2011)

Read more HERE.

The National study of the changing workforce (NCSW)

Ellen Galinsky, Kerstin Aumann, & James Bond (2009)

Read more HERE.

Employment Data

The proportions of employed men and women are rapidly approaching parity, and women may actually represent a larger proportion of the wage and salaried labor force than men by now.

The gender gap in earnings is slowly narrowing; however, the average full-time employed woman earned 80% of what men earned on a weekly basis, a big increase, but still a large gap.